Chuang Yi Gallery

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Hello! My name is Lina....

I began making jewelry shortly after coming to the United States from China in 1999, and the hobby quickly became my life’s work and passion. Over the years I have developed my craft and have sold jewelry all over the country, and I have apprenticed many young jewelers and entrepreneurs who now own their own production lines. Chuang Yi, meaning originality or wealth in Chinese, which will feature many diverse styles of jewelry and cultural gifts. The collections express our love of the natural world through its flowing organic shapes and gemstones, and our passion of spreading peace and well being through our unique cultural Buddhist and Chinese Fengshui lines. Contact us if you have any questions. We appreciate any time you give us, and always welcome feedback and support. Lina Zhang: (917) 892-8827 | Dylan Miller: (814) 853-5796

Blue Topaz Gold Hoop Pendant

Blue Topaz Gold Hoop Pendant

$125.00
Product Code: N193
  • Sold By: Chuang Yi Gallery
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    Product Description

    This necklace made with 14k gold fill wire. An affordable gold, 14k is recognized by its alluring amber tinge and is favored by many over 18k and 24k gold for this reason (as well as the more modest price!) This particular piece uses wire hoops and an elegantly twisted wire accent, studded with topaz drops.


    This necklace is adjustable between 16 and 18 inches.


    Want to learn more about topaz? Read below!


    Topaz:

    Geology: Many consumers know topaz as simply an inexpensive blue gem. They’re surprised to learn that its blue color is hardly ever natural: It’s almost always caused by treatment. They might also be surprised to know that topaz has so many more colors to offer gem lovers, including pinks and purples that rival the finest fancy sapphires. The color varieties are often identified simply by hue name—blue topaz, pink topaz, and so forth—but there are also a couple of special trade names. Imperial topaz is a medium reddish orange to orange-red. This is one of the gem’s most expensive colors. Sherry topaz—named after the sherry wine—is a yellowish brown or brownish yellow to orange. Stones in this color range are often called precious topaz to help distinguish them from the similarly colored but less expensive citrine.

    Topaz is also pleochroic, meaning that the gem can show different colors in different crystal directions. Colorless topaz is plentiful and is commonly heated or irradiated to form blue topaz or coated with a metallic substance to produce mystic topaz. It usually forms in fractures and cavities of igneous rocks such as pegmatite and rhyolite, late in their cooling history. It is also found as water-worn pebbles in stream sediments derived from those igneous rocks.

    History and Lore: Most authorities agree that the name topaz comes from Topazios, the old Greek name for a small island in the Red Sea, now called Zabargad. (The island never produced topaz, but it was once a source of peridot, which was confused with topaz before the development of modern mineralogy.) Some scholars trace the origin back to Sanskrit (an ancient language of India) and the word topas or tapaz, meaning “fire.” The ancient Greeks believed that topaz gave them strength. In Europe during the Renaissance (the period from the 1300s to the 1600s) people thought that topaz could break magic spells and dispel anger. For centuries, many people in India have believed that topaz worn above the heart assures long life, beauty, and intelligence. The name for imperial topaz originated in nineteenth-century Russia. At the time, the Ural Mountains were topaz’s leading source, and the pink gemstone mined there was named to honor the Russian czar. Ownership of the gem was restricted to the royal family. Today, topaz is one of the US birthstones for November. The other is citrine quartz.

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